Archive for October, 2011

FOOD COMBINING MAY BE THE KEY FOR YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH – PART III (CARBOHYDRATES)

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VEGETABLES: The variety of vegetables is abundant and provides the widest range of suitable food combinations. Fresh salads are optimum nutritionally and combine very well with all grains, or nuts and seeds, or animal proteins or legumes.

  • Ideally, fresh vegetables and cooked vegetables are not the best combinations, especially when including the group of starchy vegetables (see charts).


  • Depending on personal taste, numerous combinations of fresh vegetables can be excellent. The taste and colors of vegetables enhances the appetite of any protein meal and combines very well.

  • Vegetables with dairy foods also combine very well. Remember to avoid diary especially cows products. Goat or sheep products (yogurt, cheese, EXCEPT MILK), if well tolerated could be eaten from time to time. Ideally you can combine any vegetable with any protein food or grain and legume meal.

  • Salads combine very well with proteins or starches. Any nonstarchy vegetables (see charts) may be combined with proteins or starch, except tomatoes, which should especially not be used with starches. The green leafy vegetables combine very well with most other foods. They are excellent food and should be used in the diet.
  • Lettuce and other green and nonstarchy vegetables leave the stomach with little change—they pass through the stomach rapidly unless delayed by oily dressings or foods that require a more thorough gastric digestion.
  • If these vegetables are held up in the stomach with other foods, as when using salad with nuts, there is no fermentation.

STARCHY VEGETABLES.

  • Most starch vegetables need to be cooked for easy digestion. Starch vegetables when cooked are prepaired into less complex starches and when digested they require the action of the enzyme ptyalin,which is produced by the action of chewing and salivary glands.
  • Sliced or grated raw starch vegetables such as carrot,radish,beatroot and pumpkin can be a colourful and nutritious addition to a meal.
  • Ideally,starch vegetables should not be combined with nuts,seeds,grains,legumes and animal proteins.

  • Starch vegetables combine well with one another and they combine fairly well with other cooked vegetables and dairy foods such as cheese or yogurt. If two different starches are eaten together in small quantities, this is thought to not cause problems.
  • Slightly starchy vegetables may be combined with more starchy vegetables (e.g. carrots with potatoes).

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion.

 FRUITS:

  • Do not combine fruit with any vegetables except lettuce and celery.

It is best not to combine fruits with vegetables (especially cooked vegetables), proteins or starches because if such a combination of food is eaten, the digestion of the fruit will be delayed and subject to fermentation. Lettuce and celery, however, may be combined with any fruit except melon, and will cause no problem.

Dr. Vetrano says, “Taking green uncooked vegetables with a fruit meal is perfectly all right. Even though some charts state that subacid and sweet fruits combine fair to poorly with green uncooked vegetables, the feeding practices at the Health School indicate that these are good combinations, indeed, even enhancing digestion of the fruit in some conditions of impaired digestion.”

Acid Fruits, Subacid Fruits, Sweet Fruits (see charts at the end of this article)

  • Acid fruits may be used with subacid fruits.

This is an acceptable combination, though some subacid fruits are rather high in sugar and the acid fruit may delay the sugar’s normally quick exit from the stomach. However, there is no sharp line of division between the acid and subacid fruits. If combining subacid fruit with acid fruit, it is better to use only the less subacid fruit.

The acid fruits are those with the tart flavors, for example, citrus, pineapple, strawberries, and certain varieties of apples and other fruits. Tomatoes are also considered acid fruit (without the sugar content of other acid fruit). Tomatoes should not be combined with subacid fruit, nor any other kinds of fruit.

They are best combined with the salad at a meal at which no starchy foods are served.

Acid fruits are best used alone (a single variety), but if used in combination with other acid fruits, this is considered an acceptable combination.

  • Subacid fruits may be used with sweet fruits.

There is no sharp line of division between subacid fruits and sweet fruits. When using subacid fruits with sweet fruits, it is best to use the sweeter varieties of subacid fruit. The subacid fruits are those that possess a slightly acid flavor (but not tart), such as pears, certain apples, grapes, etc. Grapes, for example, can be acid, subacid or sweet. The sweet fruits are those that are rich in sugar and taste sweet-bananas, persimmons, sweet grapes, and so forth, and all dried fruit.

Some people prefer to eat bananas alone, but most people have no difficulty in combining them with subacid and other sweet fruit at a fruit meal.

Dr. Shelton says, “While I have found that bananas combine fairly well with dates, raisins, grapes and a few other sweet fruits and with green leafy vegetables, such as lettuce and celery, I have noted that they digest best if eaten alone. This calls, to mind the fact that Tilden, also, after much testing of the matter, reached the conclusion that bananas are best eaten alone.”

Dried sweet fruits should be used sparingly. Use but one kind at a meal, in small amounts, combined only with subacid fruit and/or fresh sweet fruit and/or with lettuce and/or celery. Overeating of dried fruits will often bring on symptoms similar to a “cold”. The sugar concentration is naturally greater in fruits which have been dried. Some dried fruits, esp. dried apricots, should be soaked overnight to replenish the missing water. Dates are usually used without soaking, figs or raisins can be used either way. If they are rather hard, soaking will soften and improve them.

Sweet fruits combine fairly well with subacid fruits, provided the subacid fruits are on the “sweet side,” for example, use Delicious apples, not Macintosh or Jonathans, with sweet fruit.

It is best to have these fruits at a fruit meal combining only with lettuce and/or celery. Since fruits are usually high in acids or sugars, they do not combine well with other foods.

  • Do not combine sweet fruits with foods that require a long digestive time-foods such as proteins, starches and acid fruits.

The sugars in sweet fruit should be tree to leave the stomach quickly, in perhaps fifteen or twenty minutes, and are apt to ferment if digestion is delayed by mixture with other foods.

Sugar-starch combinations cause additional problems.

When sugar is taken, the mouth quickly fills with saliva, but no ptyalin is present. Ptyalin is essential for starch digestion. If starch is disguised by sugar, honey, molasses, syrup or sweet fruit, the signals are scrambled and digestion is impaired.

Fermentation is inevitable if sugars of any kind are delayed in the stomach awaiting the digestion of starch, protein or acid fruit.

Sugar also has a marked inhibiting effect on the flow of gastric juice and on gastric motility. No other food depresses the action of the stomach and the desire for food as does sugar.

Take Melons Alone

  • Do not consume melons with any other foods.

This rule has been somewhat under question in recent years. Many people who have complained that melons did not agree with them have no trouble handling them when eating only melon at a meal. If you have a history of digestive problems, don’t do it at all.

Melons are more than 90 percent liquid and leave the stomach quickly if not delayed and fermented by combining with other foods.

Generally, all fruits require fairly simple digestion when compaired to starches,proteins and fats,but melons require no digestion in the stomach and are basically the simplest food to assimulate, due to their very high water content and very simple structure;they contain no protein,no fats and a minute carbohydrate content. Melons are best thought of as a drink and should not be eaten after a large meal.They are an ideal breakfast food,make a melon fruit salad with no other food and that will provide maximum benefits and taste sensation. A small quantity of melon with a fruit salad is alright occasionally. Avoid eating melons though with or after a large complex meal because fermentation can occur and lead to gass and possibly stomach and intestinal pains. Let the melon give you the simplest meal alone.

Dr. Vetrano says, “Melons are best taken alone because the sugar and other nutriments are in a less stable form than the nutrients of other fruits. Orange juice may be kept in the refrigerator for an hour with little change in flavor, but if you refrigerate watermelon juice for only ten minutes, its flavor, color and composition markedly change. It decomposes much more quickly than other fruits. Consequently, if it is held in the stomach awaiting the digestion of other foods, it will decompose (ferment) and cause a great deal of gastric distress. Eating watermelon with nuts can really be troublesome.”

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion.

CHARTS

Full list of starchy vegetables

All kinds of potatoes are in this classification. Also included are yams, winter squashes (such as buttercup, hubbard and banana squashes), pumpkin, caladium root, taro root, cassava root and Jerusalem artichokes. (Note: Technically, squashes and pumpkins are fruits.)

Vegetable

% of Carbohydrates

% of Fats

% of Proteins

Glycemic Index

Quantity

Beet canned

90

3

7

64

1 cup (246 g)

Black Beans boiled

74

3

23

64

1 cup (172 g)

Beet cooked

71

6

23

30

1 cup (144 g)

Beet greens

71

6

23

64

1 cup (144 g)

White Sweet Corn, raw

80

11

9

56

1 cup (254 g)

Parsnips

91

4

5

97

Half cup (178 g)

Potato New, boiled

93

1

6

59

Half cup (78 g)

Potato Red, baked

88

2

10

93

(299 g)

Potato Sweet

93

1

6

52

1 cup (200 g)

Potato White, mashed

90

1

9

70

299 g

Tomato orange

72

10

18

50

1 cup (158 g)

Tomato soup

84

8

8

38

Half cup (121 g)

Yam

95

1

4

54

1 cup (136 g)

Green Peas, soup

65

15

20

66

Half cup (128 g)

Green Peas, frozen

72

4

24

47

1 cup (134 g)

Peas, boiled

68

5

27

48

1 cup (160 g)

Lima Beans, frozen

76

2

22

32

311 g

Baked Beans canned

79

3

18

48

1 cup (253 g)

Kidney Beans boiled

73

3

24

29

1 cup

Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas)

78

8

14

33

1 cup (240 g)

Lima Beans

77

3

20

32

124 g

Navy Beans

74

3

23

38

262 g

Pinto Beans canned

72

8

20

39

240 g

Lentils boiled

70

3

27

30

200 g

Plantains cooked

97

1

2

70

200 g

Winter Acorn baked

93

2

5

205 g

Winter Butternut boiled

93

2

5

51

205

Mildly starchy vegetables:

This classification includes carrots, cauliflower, beets, rutabaga and salsify.

Carrots
Globe artichokes
Beets
Rutabaga
Edible pod peas
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*
Pumpkin*
Water chestnuts
Sprouted grains

Low starchy Vegetables

Vegetable

Form

Carb Count

Sprouts (Beans, Alfafa)

Raw

0.4

Greens (Lettuce, Spinach, Chard) (Half cup)

Raw

1.6

Aparagus

Boiled

0.7

Bamboo Shoots

Canned

0.7

Spring Cabbage

Boiled

0.6

Celery

Raw

0.9

Watercress

Raw

0.4

Common Mushrooms

Raw

0.4

Chicory

Raw

1

Curly Kale

Raw

1.4

Green and Purple Broccolli

Boiled

1.3

Chinese Cabbage

Raw

1.4

Courgette (Zucchini)

Raw

1.8

Unpeeled Cucumber

Raw

1.5

Fennel

Raw

1.8

Lettuce

Raw

1.2

Marrow

Boiled

1.8

Asparagus

Raw

2

Aubergine (Eggplant)

Raw

2.2

Cauliflower

Boiled

2.3

Pumpkin

Raw

2.2

Red Radish

Raw

2

Capsicum (Green Pepper)

Raw

2.6

Basic Acid Fruits:

Blackberry, Orange, Passion Fruit, Strawberry, Tangerine, Tomato (technically a fruit), Ugly Fruit, Grapefruit, Acerola Cherry, Grapefruit, Pineapple.

Basic Subacid Fruits:

Apple, Papaya, Peach, Pear, Raspberry, Ugly Fruit, Apricot, Blackberry, Blueberry, Grape, Cherry, Mango, Mulberry, Nectarine, Tamarillo, Guava.

Basic Sweet Fruits:

Banana, Date, Fig, Sapote, Persimmon, Cherimoya, Carob, Mammea, Plantain, Sapodilla, Sugar Apple.

Melons:

Watermelon, Honeydew, Casaba, Cantaloupe, Ambrosia, Banana Melon, Canary, Gaia, Muskmelon, Rock Melon, Winter Melon.

Cereal grains:

This includes all cereals, whether they’re whole or refined, raw or cooked. Examples are wheat, rye, barley, rice, millet, buckwheat and oats.

Legumes:

This includes peanuts, lentils, peas and beans.

Raw foods improve the total inner environment. Sluggish bowels begin to move, eventually cleaning out waste that may have been lodged in the folds of the intestine for months. The layer of mucus that forms in the intestines when cooked food predominates is removed, greatly increasing efficiency in the absorption of nutrients. Food wastes don’t stay in the bowel long enough to putrefy. The transit time of raw food in a healthy body is 20 to 24 hours, while cooked food may take three days or longer.

Don’t forget to print the chart which follows in order to remember and try the food combinations! Click here in case  you have problems with enlarging the image.

Sources: http://www.rawfoodexplained.com

FOOD COMBINING MAY BE THE KEY FOR YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH – PART II (PROTEIN)

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Protein, Carbohydates, Fat and their deeper classifications

Most foods can be readily classified according to the organic compounds (proteins, carbohydrates, fats, etc.) they contain in greatest abundance.

Proteins, along with carbohydrates and fats, form the major components of living matter. They maintain the functional activity of the cells and serve as structural and reserve materials.

This is a general classification of foods. EVERY food contains more or less an amount of protein, carbohydrates and/or fats at the same time, of course, each in different proportions. Meats for example are basically high in protein and that’s why they are characterized as proteins even if they also contain carbs and fats, vegetables or legumes contain basically carbohydrates and thus characterized as carbs etc. Same goes for nuts, fruits etc. Going deeper to these analogies will help us find out the right combinations so that we have the best digestion and less delay of foods in our stomach or the gut, which can cause fermentation and several bad bacteria to grow.

Let’s examine some basic rules of food combining concerning protein:

ANIMAL PROTEINS::Compared to all other food groups,the animal protein foods require the most complex digestion, especially within the stomach. They all require high concen-trations of the enzyme pepsinogen,which is made up from hydrochloric acid and the enzyme pepsin.

  • The best combination for animal protein foods is with salads or cooked vegetables, ΝΟ starchy vegetables (see below). Therefore, do not combine nuts with cheese, nor any of the following concentrated protein foods with each other: nuts, avocado, soy beans, cheese, eggs, flesh foods.
  • Alfalfa sprouts, which are considered a green vegetable, may be used with a concentrated protein.
  • A seafood combination is alright if no other food groups are eaten at the same time, apart from salads.
  • A mixed grill is a very complicated meal to digest, especially when potatoes and other starches are combined. DO NOT combine animal protein with starches. Your body requires an acid base to digest proteins and an alkaline base to digest starches.

  • Any fish meal is ideal with salads or cooked vegetables. Fish and chips are a fair combination,but not as a regular meal.
  • Eggs should not be combined with other animal proteins. Eggs in vegetable omelets is alright.
  • It is not recommended to combine any animal protein food with another or with cheese.

  • Do not eat acid fruits (see chart) with proteins. Citrus, tomatoes, pineapple, strawberries and other acid fruits should not be eaten with nuts, cheese, eggs or meat. Acid fruits inhibit the flow of gastric juice. The digestion of protein requires an unhampered flow. This is one rule that has given rise to some disagreement and controversy.
  • Do not consume proteins with fats (see chart).

Fat has an inhibiting influence on digestive secretion and lessen the amount and activity of pepsin and hydrochloric acid, necessary for the digestion of protein. The fat may lower the entire digestive tone more than 50 percent. Since most proteins already contain a good deal of fat, it would certainly be contraindicated to add more to the meal.

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion. If you find any of these rules bad for your stomach simply do not apply it. Above the theories, reality is the best guide for you!

Starchy or high Carbohydrate Vegetables

All kinds of potatoes are in this classification. Also included are yams, winter squashes (such as buttercup, hubbard and banana squashes), pumpkin, caladium root, taro root, cassava root and Jerusalem artichokes. (Note: Technically, squashes and pumpkins are fruits.).

Full list of starchy vegetables

Vegetable

% of Carbohydrates

% of Fats

% of Proteins

Glycemic Index

Quantity

Beet canned

90

3

7

64

1 cup (246 g)

Black Beans boiled

74

3

23

64

1 cup (172 g)

Beet cooked

71

6

23

30

1 cup (144 g)

Beet greens

71

6

23

64

1 cup (144 g)

White Sweet Corn, raw

80

11

9

56

1 cup (254 g)

Parsnips

91

4

5

97

Half cup (178 g)

Potato New, boiled

93

1

6

59

Half cup (78 g)

Potato Red, baked

88

2

10

93

(299 g)

Potato Sweet

93

1

6

52

1 cup (200 g)

Potato White, mashed

90

1

9

70

299 g

Tomato orange

72

10

18

50

1 cup (158 g)

Tomato soup

84

8

8

38

Half cup (121 g)

Yam

95

1

4

54

1 cup (136 g)

Green Peas, soup

65

15

20

66

Half cup (128 g)

Green Peas, frozen

72

4

24

47

1 cup (134 g)

Peas, boiled

68

5

27

48

1 cup (160 g)

Lima Beans, frozen

76

2

22

32

311 g

Baked Beans canned

79

3

18

48

1 cup (253 g)

Kidney Beans boiled

73

3

24

29

1 cup

Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas)

78

8

14

33

1 cup (240 g)

Lima Beans

77

3

20

32

124 g

Navy Beans

74

3

23

38

262 g

Pinto Beans canned

72

8

20

39

240 g

Lentils boiled

70

3

27

30

200 g

Plantains cooked

97

1

2

70

200 g

Winter Acorn baked

93

2

5

205 g

Winter Butternut boiled

93

2

5

51

205 g

Mildly starchy vegetables

This classification includes carrots, cauliflower, beets, rutabaga and salsify.

Carrots
Globe artichokes
Beets
Rutabaga
Edible pod peas
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*
Pumpkin*
Water chestnuts
Sprouted grains

Low starchy Vegetables

Vegetable

Form

Carb Count

Sprouts (Beans, Alfafa)

Raw

0.4

Greens (Lettuce, Spinach, Chard) (Half cup)

Raw

1.6

Aparagus

Boiled

0.7

Bamboo Shoots

Canned

0.7

Spring Cabbage

Boiled

0.6

Celery

Raw

0.9

Watercress

Raw

0.4

Common Mushrooms

Raw

0.4

Chicory

Raw

1

Curly Kale

Raw

1.4

Green and Purple Broccolli

Boiled

1.3

Chinese Cabbage

Raw

1.4

Courgette (Zucchini)

Raw

1.8

Unpeeled Cucumber

Raw

1.5

Fennel

Raw

1.8

Lettuce

Raw

1.2

Marrow

Boiled

1.8

Asparagus

Raw

2

Aubergine (Eggplant)

Raw

2.2

Cauliflower

Boiled

2.3

Pumpkin

Raw

2.2

Red Radish

Raw

2

Capsicum (Green Pepper)

Raw

2.6

BASIC CHART (CLICK TO ENLARGE):

Sources: http://www.rawfoodexplained.com

FOOD COMBINING MAY BE THE KEY FOR YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH – PART I (THE THEORY)

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Have you ever thought that the way you combine your food may help or worsen your digestion?

Have you noticed that some meals creates you bloating, gass, delay in you digestion?

Are you constantly constipated?

Even if you are not having obvious signs of digestive impairment you should begin considering the way you combine your foods!

Especially those who face digestive problems should take seriously the idea of how to combine their foods in each meal.

But lets start explaining the idea behind food combining…

The food combining system, as a whole, is simple and easy to understand. It logically evolved from the study of gastric physiology and the actions of enzymes and digestive juices. It is not what we eat, but what we digest and assimilate, that determines the nourishment our bodies receive. Food combining is based on the discovery that certain combinations of food may be digested with greater ease and efficiency than others.

Correct food combinations result in an immediate improvement in health by lightening the load of the digestive organs. Better nutrition is assured, and there is better digestion, less fermentation and putrefaction, more comfort, less distress and less gas. So-called food allergies often disappear as a result of proper food combining.

Foods and our body

Food is any substance which is eventually convertible into such end-products as tissues, body fluids, etc., and can be utilized by the organism in the performance of its functions. Foods help you when you are oxidized, contribute decisively to growth, maintenance and repair. They are capable of being stored within the body and produce no nutritionally significant toxic effects.

Nutrients in foods are chemical substances of known composition and structure, classified as carbohydrates (such as sugar, starch and glycogen); lipids (fats); proteins (amino acids linked together); salts (minerals); and vitamins, needed in small quantities (or, traces) by the body. In addition, foods contain indigestible materials—cellulose (fiber).

Water, oxygen and vitamins, together with proteins, carbohydrates, fats and minerals, form the constituents of the body—the blood, tissue, bones, organs, muscles and so forth. Foods must be taken into the digestive tract and prepared for use by the organism before their constituents may be used by the body.

BASIC PHILOSOPHY IN FOOD COMBINATION

Food combination theory is based on the functioning of enzymes. Digestive enzymes are enzymes that break down foods into their smaller building blocks, in order to facilitate their absorption by the body.

Each digestive enzyme is specific in its action. It acts only upon one class of food substance. Each stage in the digestion of food requires the action of a different enzyme, and the various enzymes can perform their work efficiently only if the preceding work has been properly performed.

Body chemistry is, to a large extent, determined by the the food we eat. When certain foods are eaten regularly, the digestive enzymes and secretions are of a character to handle those foods. When the diet is altered, more and more of the digestive juices secreted will be of a character to digest the foods in the new diet, and less and less of the digestive juices will be of the character to digest the foods in the old diet.

The type of digestive juice fitted for the digestion of one type of food is of no value in digesting another type of food. Therefore, it is essential that food be taken in combinations that do not interfere with enzymatic action.

When two foods are eaten that have different or even opposite, digestive needs, the precise adjustment of digestive juices to meet requirements becomes impossible.

Digestive speed and efficiency vary with individuals and circumstances. However, certain general statements can be made:

  • Simple carbs, or sugars, only require one step for digestion, which is why they digest faster. An enzyme in the lining of the small intestine transforms sucrose into glucose and fructose to then be absorbed in that one step. (eg Juices and Water: 20-30 minutes, Soups, Fruits, Vegetables or Smoothies: 30-45 minute)
  • Complex carbs, or starches, require more steps to digest, and therefore digest more slowly than simple carbs. Complex carbs include starchy vegetables, legumes, whole-grain breads and cereals. The enzymes in saliva break complex carb molecules into maltose, which is a smaller and simpler molecule. Next, an enzyme in the small intestine’s lining splits maltose molecules into glucose molecules, which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. The blood transports glucose to the liver, where is is either used for energy or stored for later use. (eg Grains, Starches: 2-3 hours)
  • Protein requires more digestion time in the stomach than carbs. Giant protein molecules are in foods like beans, eggs and meat. Because the molecules are so large, it takes a longer process to break them down before they can be used as fuel. An enzyme in the stomach begins to digest protein. Protein molecules then move into the small intestine, where several more enzymes break down the molecules into amino acids. The smaller amino acid molecules pass through the walls of the small intestine to get into the bloodstream. When you run out of the energy you got from glucose, which started as carbs, your body turns to protein or fats for energy. This process is known as gluconeogenesis. To make more glucose from protein, the body converts amino acids into glucose to use for fuel. (eg Beans, Poultry, Meat, or Fish: more than three hours)
  • Fats take more time to digest than carbs or proteins. Fats pass through the stomach and into the small intestine as other nutrients do. The body breaks fat molecules into fatty acids and glycerowhich the villi in the small intestine can absorb. The fatty acids and glycerol travel to areas of the body for storage in cells or for use as energy. Your body can only use about five percent of absorbed fat for fuel by converting it to glucose. Your liver absorbs the rest of the glycerol and uses it to assist in breaking down glucose for energy.
  • Some foods may take five or six hours or more to leave the stomach. Some examples are combination starch/protein foods like legumes (including beans), grains, cooked cabbage and flesh foods.

Most digestion occurs in the stomach and small intestine. Digestion, especially starch digestion, actually begins in the mouth, with mastication and insalivation of the food. This sends the proper signals for the release of the digestive juices suited to the character of the food eaten. Digestive juices are present in the saliva and in the gastric secretions of about five million microscopic glands in the walls of the stomach.

Food Sequencing Is also very important: Organize your meals

A well ordered meal allows your digestive system to handle digestion more smoothly, with less time and more absorption of nutrients. A well ordered meal is one in which you introduce different foods systematically.

You should start by introducing the easiest or quickest to digest foods first and work your way up to the more complex. By doing this you keep foods that digest more easily flowing through your digestive system and prevent a “food traffic jam”.

Denser and less liquid foods are harder to digest and take longer to pass completely through the digestive system.

Think of your digestive system as a highway; if the slower vehicles are allowed to go first, the result will be a traffic jam. If the slower vehicles follow the faster vehicles you’re highway will run smoothly and efficiently.

It is important to note that when choosing a beverage, milk products are hard to digest and should be taken alone. The easiest type of beverage to digest is water or one high in water content.

Sources:

  • http://www.puristat.com
  • http://www.livestrong.com
  • http://www.rawfoodexplained.com
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