Archive for July, 2009

Vitamins Fight MS

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(OMNS) New research confirms that niacinamide, also known as vitamin B-3, is a key to the successful treatment of multiple sclerosis and other nerve diseases. [1] Niacinamide, say researchers at Harvard Medical School, “profoundly prevents the degeneration of demyelinated axons and improves the behavioral deficits.”

This is very good news, but it is not at all new news. Over 60 years ago, Canadian physician H.T. Mount began treating multiple sclerosis patients with intravenous B-1 (thiamine) plus intramuscular liver extract, which provides other B-vitamins. He followed the progress of these patients for up to 27 years. The results were excellent and were described in a paper published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in 1973. [2]

Mount was not alone. Forty years ago, Frederick Robert Klenner, M.D., of North Carolina, was using vitamins B-3 and B-1, along with the rest of the B-complex vitamins, vitamins C and E, and other nutrients including magnesium, calcium and zinc to arrest and reverse multiple sclerosis. [3,4] Klenner’s complete treatment program was originally published as “Treating Multiple Sclerosis Nutritionally,” Cancer Control Journal 2:3, p 16-20.

Drs. Mount and Klenner were persuaded by their clinical observations that multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and many other neurological disorders were primarily due to nerve cells being starved of nutrients. Each physician tested this theory by giving his patients large, orthomolecular quantities of nutrients. Mount’s and Klenner’s successful cures over decades of medical practice proved their theory was correct. B-complex vitamins, including thiamine as well as niacinamide, are absolutely vital for nerve cell health. Where pathology already exists, unusually large quantities of vitamins are needed to repair damaged nerve cells.

Nutritional therapy is inexpensive, effective and, most important, safe. There is not even one death per year from vitamins. [5]

Vitamin supplementation is not the problem. It is under-nutrition that is the problem. Vitamins are the solution.

Restoring health must be done nutritionally, not pharmacologically. All cells in all persons are made exclusively from what we drink and eat. Not one cell is made out of drugs.

References:

[1] Kaneko S, Wang J, Kaneko M, Yiu G, Hurrell JM, Chitnis T, Khoury SJ, He Z. Protecting axonal degeneration by increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models. J Neurosci. 2006 Sep 20;26(38):9794-804.

[2] Mount HT. Multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases. Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jun 2;108(11):1356-1358.

[3] Frederick R. Klenner. “Response of Peripheral and Central Nerve Pathology to Mega-Doses of the Vitamin B-Complex and Other Metabolites”, Journal of Applied Nutrition, 1973,

[4] Dr. Klenner’s “Clinical Guide to the Use of Vitamin C” (which discusses orthomolecular therapy with all vitamins, not just vitamin C) is now posted in its entirety. It includes a multiple sclerosis protocol, which takes up about five pages. See also: http://www.doctoryourself.com/klennerpaper.html

[5] Watson WA et al. 2003 annual report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System. Am J Emerg Med. 2004 Sep;22(5):335-404.

Smoking may speed progress of multiple sclerosis

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NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who smoke have a speedier progression of the disease, a new study in the Archives of Neurology suggests.

Dr. Alberto Ascherio of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and his colleagues also found that smokers with MS were more likely to have the progressive form of the disease, in which symptoms steadily get worse, rather than the relapsing-remitting form, in which a person has MS symptoms intermittently.

“Most of the adverse effects were seen for current smokers, which in some way is good news because it suggests that stopping smoking can help,” Ascherio told Reuters Health.

People who smoke are known to be at increased MS risk, but research on whether smoking affects the course of the illness has had conflicting results, he and his colleagues note. They followed 1,465 MS patients, 17.5% of whom were current smokers, for an average of just over three years to investigate.

Of the 891 patients the team followed for that period to determine the rate of progression from one form of disease to the other, 72 saw their MS progress to the worse relapsing-remitting form: 20 of 154 smokers, 20 of 237 ex-smokers, and 32 of 500 never-smokers.

That meant that the smokers were 2.4 times as likely as non-smokers to have primary progressive MS, and those who had relapsing-remitting disease were 2.5 times more likely than never-smokers to develop secondary progressive MS during the follow-up period.

At the study’s outset, the smokers had more disability, more severe disease, and more atrophy in their brains. Over time, they also showed a faster increase in the total amount of injured brain tissue and their degree of brain atrophy.

The mechanism through which cigarette smoking could worsen MS isn’t clear, Ascherio said. Smoking has been linked to some other autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, he noted, but not others, so the habit’s effects on the immune system could be a factor; another possibility would be that cigarette smoke is toxic to the nervous system.

There are currently no proven risk factors for progression of MS that a patient can do anything about, Ascherio noted.

“Although causality remains to be proved,” he and his colleagues write, “these findings suggest that patients with MS who quit smoking may not only reduce their risk of smoking-related diseases but also delay the progression of MS.”

SOURCE: Archives of Neurology, July 2009.

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